Grant helps families with ill, injured pets


Alden Waitt - Forthe Sentinel



This is one of two cats whose emergency care was paid for by the Meigs County Humane Society. Both cats are reported to be doing well.


Courtesy photo

POMEROY — A Meigs County resident need not part with a beloved dog or cat because that pet is afflicted by injury or illness, thanks to a grant to the Meigs County Humane Society from the Banfield Foundation.

Founded in 2015 by Banfield Pet Hospital, the Banfield Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to improving the well-being of pets and communities. The foundation’s mission is to elevate the power of the human-animal bond, strengthen the pet welfare community, provide disaster relief for pets and advance the science of veterinary medicine through fostering innovation and education.

Awarded $5,000 from the Banfield Foundation in January, the Meigs County Humane Society will now be able to assist more owners of cats and dogs who need assistance in paying for part or all of their pet’s veterinary costs.

According to Vicky Baer, coordinator of the Animal Rescue Project (ARP), which assists the pets of Meigs County residents, “this generous and most welcome grant will help ensure that no pets go untreated, are abandoned, or euthanized simply because the owners are having difficulty paying for veterinary care. The funds will allow the MCHS to assist numerous owners who approach the organization for help with a diverse range of veterinary issues.

“For example,” Baer said, “in the past, the county veterinarians treated an adult cat suffering from an acute upper respiratory infection with oxygen and antibiotics, and a kitten afflicted with severe intestinal parasites and an infected eye was cured with medication. Also helped was a small mixed-breed dog taken in as a stray the year before whose tumor was removed, ensuring that she would have many more years with her family.”

She added: “Owners who can show proof of low income, such as a food stamp or Medicaid card, Social Security Disability or unemployment verification will qualify for help with ARP. The Meigs County Humane Society and the Banfield Foundation wish to alleviate owners’ stress and help keep these dependent dogs and cats with their families, so they can lead long happy lives.”

The MCHS, which relies on income from the Meigs County Humane Society Thrift Shoppe in Middleport, as well as donations and membership dues, to finance its programs, can also help with spay/neuter assistance and with securing food for pets of families in crisis. All are welcome to visit and donate items or funds to the Thrift Shoppe, which has a new and permanent home at 253 N. Second Avenue in Middleport.

Baer said: “We ask county residents to support our thrift shop and become members of the society, and in this way, assist us in making lives better for the county’s animals. Not only does the shop help fund our activities, but it also serves as a clearinghouse for animal welfare issues. People interested in any of our programs, including assistance from ARP should visit the shop or call 992-6064 or 992-6060.”

The MCHS also employs, with the county, a part-time Humane Officer who answers all calls about cruelty, abuse, and neglect and he can be reached at 992-6060. All concerns about stray or dogs running at large should be directed to the Meigs County Dog Shelter at 992-3779.

This is one of two cats whose emergency care was paid for by the Meigs County Humane Society. Both cats are reported to be doing well.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_cat.jpgThis is one of two cats whose emergency care was paid for by the Meigs County Humane Society. Both cats are reported to be doing well. Courtesy photo

http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_wellkitty-001.jpgCourtesy photo

Alden Waitt

Forthe Sentinel

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