21st century wonders


New Haven math students connect math skills with latesy technology development

By Mindy Kearns - For the Register



A fifth-grade student at New Haven Elementary is pictured as she “walks the streets of Paris” with the Google cardboard virtual reality goggles. Technology integration specialists from RESA 5 attended “Techy Tuesday” to show the children the latest in technology.


Todd Murray, left, technology integration specialist for Jackson County, is shown as he demonstrates the “Makey-Makey” with fifth grade math students at New Haven Elementary. Using a laptop computer, the students were able to test various items to see if they were conductors of electricity, including apples and oranges.


What is RESA?

The Regional Education Service Agencies is a constantly evolving vision of 21st century learning, driven by goals to continue a positive, on-going transformation of education in West Virginia’s county schools, with outcomes that influence the success of students, teachers and school administrators. With a track record of achievement, the agencies are providing cost effective services and lifelong education programs to school systems and communities, while saving taxpayer’s money.

NEW HAVEN, W.Va. — Fifth-graders at New Haven Elementary recently learned the correlation between mathematics and the latest technology, when technology integration specialists from RESA 5 attended “Techy Tuesday.”

According to teacher Kira Northup, the fifth-grade math students became extremely interested in the latest technology after reading the March issue of Scholastic’s “DynaMath” newsletter. She said the entire issue involved coding, robots and the Lego League.

Northup invited her husband, Nick, an employee of RESA 5, to her classroom to explain the technology he teaches in the adult education classes in Point Pleasant. He, along with Todd Murray, TIS in Jackson County, and Julie Hagan, TIS and regional adult education coordinator, used the opportunity for community outreach to the elementary students.

Students were able to view the technology in stations, where they saw a 3-D printer at work, experienced virtual reality, built a robot, and participated in “Makey-Makey.”

The children were shown items made with the 3-D printer, including a replica of the famous Eiffel Tower. Kira Northup said the printer taught the children fractions and proportions.

Time was also learned, when the RESA 5 employees presented each child with a glow-in-the-dark “Pi” symbol backpack pull, made with the printer. With 72 backpack pulls in all, the children figured the amount of time it took for the pulls to be made.

The Google cardboard virtual reality goggles allowed the children to walk the streets of Paris, among other adventures. Using this device, the students learned measurements and how tall buildings are.

Kira Northup said the Lego robot taught arrays, while the “Makey-Makey” tested various items to see if they were conductors of electricity.

All of the technology is used in the adult education classes taught by RESA 5, which is based in Parkersburg. Nick Northup said the devices are used to entice the adult learners to get their GED, and to look at colleges and different careers.

“We like to teach them 21st century technology,” Hagan said.

Hagan also stated while this was the first time the instructors taught in an elementary setting, many RESA 5 employees take part in Read Across America Day, during which community leaders go into the schools to read to students. She concluded by saying she believes in the importance of showing students the opportunities of technology.

A fifth-grade student at New Haven Elementary is pictured as she “walks the streets of Paris” with the Google cardboard virtual reality goggles. Technology integration specialists from RESA 5 attended “Techy Tuesday” to show the children the latest in technology.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_6.2-PPR-tech-1-1.jpgA fifth-grade student at New Haven Elementary is pictured as she “walks the streets of Paris” with the Google cardboard virtual reality goggles. Technology integration specialists from RESA 5 attended “Techy Tuesday” to show the children the latest in technology.

Todd Murray, left, technology integration specialist for Jackson County, is shown as he demonstrates the “Makey-Makey” with fifth grade math students at New Haven Elementary. Using a laptop computer, the students were able to test various items to see if they were conductors of electricity, including apples and oranges.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_6.2-PPR-Tech-2-1.jpgTodd Murray, left, technology integration specialist for Jackson County, is shown as he demonstrates the “Makey-Makey” with fifth grade math students at New Haven Elementary. Using a laptop computer, the students were able to test various items to see if they were conductors of electricity, including apples and oranges.
New Haven math students connect math skills with latesy technology development

By Mindy Kearns

For the Register

What is RESA?

The Regional Education Service Agencies is a constantly evolving vision of 21st century learning, driven by goals to continue a positive, on-going transformation of education in West Virginia’s county schools, with outcomes that influence the success of students, teachers and school administrators. With a track record of achievement, the agencies are providing cost effective services and lifelong education programs to school systems and communities, while saving taxpayer’s money.

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing who lives in Mason County.

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing who lives in Mason County.

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