No West Nile found in Meigs


By Lorna Hart - lhart@civitasmedia.com



This enlarged image shows a mosquito perching on a screen, which is one of the best ways to prevent mosquitos from entering your home.


Courtesy photos

A mosquito is show on a person’s skin ready to bite.


Courtesy photos

The best way to protect your family is to avoid avoid mosquito bites. Below are ways to help control mosquitos on your property:

* Use insect repellent when you go outdoors. Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535 and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection. To optimize safety and effectiveness, repellents should be used according to the label instructions.

* When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors. Mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent will give extra protection. Don’t apply repellents containing permethrin directly to skin. Do not spray repellent on the skin under your clothing.

* Take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours. Take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing from dusk to dawn or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.

* Empty standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths. Consider using a product containing Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), available at many garden and home improvement stores, to control mosquito larvae in containers that are too large to empty. Follow the label instructions

* Remove temporary pools of water around your house and yard. This may include clearing debris from ditches, cutting small channels to help pooling water drain, or filling in holes and tire ruts with dirt.

POMEROY — The Meigs County Health Department, working with the Ohio Department of Health’s Zoonotic Disease program, conducted mosquito trapping at several locations in Meigs County.

On July 13 and again on Aug. 10, mosquitoes found in several villages, parks and the fairgrounds were gathered for testing.

Steve Swatzel, director of environmental health for the Meigs County Health Department, said heavy rains that occurred during the Meigs County Fair, followed by hot, dry conditions, provided the stagnant pools of water ideal for breeding mosquitoes.

“This has led to more mosquitoes and more concerns from citizens regarding mosquito-borne diseases,” Swatzel said.

Mosquito trapping is a type of surveillance used to determine the kind of mosquito found in these areas and for the presence of the West Nile virus. Ohio laboratories are not testing mosquitoes for the Zika virus at this time, since the mosquito known to carry the virus are located only in states in the southern U.S.

The statewide mosquito surveillance program is looking for high populations of the Asian Tiger mosquito and to test other mosquito species for the West Nile virus.

The results of the recent trappings in Meigs County were of the 2,200 mosquitoes identified there, are Asian Tiger mosquitoes, but no West Nile Virus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent WNV infection. Most people infected with WNV will not manifest symptoms. About 1 in 5 people will develop a fever with other symptoms. Less than 1 percent of those infected develop a serious, sometimes fatal, neurological illness.

While there is much concern about the Zika virus, there is nothing to indicate that the type of mosquito responsible for carrying the disease is found in Ohio. There is a species of mosquito, known as the “Asian Tiger,” that lives in Ohio and is closely related to the one that carries Zika, but this particular mosquito is not known to carry the Zika virus.

The health department is hopeful the results of the testing will alleviate concerns about West Nile and Zika for Meigs residents.

For information on prevention messaging, surveillance or for up-to-date mosquito-borne disease information, see the ODH-ZDP mosquito website (www.odh.ohio.gov/mosquitoes) or contact the Meigs County Health Department at 740-992-6626

Contact Lorna Hart at 740-992-2155, Ext. 2551.

This enlarged image shows a mosquito perching on a screen, which is one of the best ways to prevent mosquitos from entering your home.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_1-Mosquito-on-screen-1.jpgThis enlarged image shows a mosquito perching on a screen, which is one of the best ways to prevent mosquitos from entering your home. Courtesy photos

A mosquito is show on a person’s skin ready to bite.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_1-Mosquito-on-skin-1.jpgA mosquito is show on a person’s skin ready to bite. Courtesy photos

By Lorna Hart

lhart@civitasmedia.com

The best way to protect your family is to avoid avoid mosquito bites. Below are ways to help control mosquitos on your property:

* Use insect repellent when you go outdoors. Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535 and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection. To optimize safety and effectiveness, repellents should be used according to the label instructions.

* When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors. Mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent will give extra protection. Don’t apply repellents containing permethrin directly to skin. Do not spray repellent on the skin under your clothing.

* Take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours. Take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing from dusk to dawn or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.

* Empty standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths. Consider using a product containing Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), available at many garden and home improvement stores, to control mosquito larvae in containers that are too large to empty. Follow the label instructions

* Remove temporary pools of water around your house and yard. This may include clearing debris from ditches, cutting small channels to help pooling water drain, or filling in holes and tire ruts with dirt.

comments powered by Disqus