Being prepared for the unknown


Courthouse holds active shooter training

By Sarah Hawley - [email protected]



(Clockwise from top left) The “active shooter” goes from room to room checking for unlocked doors and firing shots. Sheriff Keith Wood speaks with courthouse employees following the training. The “shooter” makes his way though the second floor hallway as students from the criminal justice program film the scenario. Chief Deputy Charlie Mansfield speaks to courthouse employees prior to the active shooter scenario.


POMEROY — It is always better to be prepared, although you hope to never need to know it.

On Friday, employees at the Meigs County Courthouse, along with the sheriff’s office, some local law offices and others who frequently conduct business in the courthouse, took part in an active shooter training.

The training was scheduled following a temporary lock down of the courthouse earlier this month after a report of possible gun shots in the area. While it turned out there were no shots fired, it showed the need to be prepared.

Chief Deputy Charlie Mansfield explained that while nothing is 100 percent it is best to be prepared to keep the averages as high as possible.

There are four steps that a person goes through when put in a threatening situation, Mansfield said. A person must perceive the threat, evaluate the threat, formulate a plan, and put the plan into action.

Mansfield told the group that under stress the brain acts different than it normally would which is why it is important to train.

The group was instructed that in the case of an active shooter situation the first option is to leave the building if they can do so safely. If exiting is not an option, then it is best to impede the shooter, barricading doorways if possible as locks are not always effective.

The active shooter scenario was played out by Adam Smith, who is now the instructor of the criminal justice program at Meigs High School, along with students from the program. The scenario also allowed for deputies to respond to the situation to train on how they would react.

Following the scenario, the group reconvened to discuss the training and what can be done to do things better.

Commissioner Tim Ihle said that in the weeks that follow the training, meetings will be held with each office to discuss what can be done to improve the safety and security of the courthouse and its employees.

(Clockwise from top left) The “active shooter” goes from room to room checking for unlocked doors and firing shots. Sheriff Keith Wood speaks with courthouse employees following the training. The “shooter” makes his way though the second floor hallway as students from the criminal justice program film the scenario. Chief Deputy Charlie Mansfield speaks to courthouse employees prior to the active shooter scenario.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/web1_1.31-Active-Shooter-2.jpg(Clockwise from top left) The “active shooter” goes from room to room checking for unlocked doors and firing shots. Sheriff Keith Wood speaks with courthouse employees following the training. The “shooter” makes his way though the second floor hallway as students from the criminal justice program film the scenario. Chief Deputy Charlie Mansfield speaks to courthouse employees prior to the active shooter scenario.
Courthouse holds active shooter training

By Sarah Hawley

[email protected]

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