Bridge in full illumination


The Bridge of Honor, connecting Pomeroy, Ohio, and Mason, W.Va., glows in full illumination Sunday night over the Ohio River. The cobalt blue lights, installed earlier this year by the West Virginia Department of Transportation (which is responsible for maintaining the bridge) after “being dark” since March 2014, had to be repaired instead of replaced because the cobalt blue color that signifies the military Purple Heart is no longer mined and lenses for the lights could not be found. Blenko Glass, in Milton, W.Va., managed to replicate the color and produce a limited number for the bridge. The original lights, according to WVDOT, burst because of the bulb heat, which reaches in excess of 200 degrees. The heat generated by the bulbs could not escape because of the original covers. Warren Skaggs, repair and design engineer with the WVDOT, told Ohio Valley Publishing earlier this year that each heat-tempered bulb was replaced, as well as several ballasts. Skaggs said the bulbs have a four-year life.


The Bridge of Honor, connecting Pomeroy, Ohio, and Mason, W.Va., glows in full illumination Sunday night over the Ohio River. The cobalt blue lights, installed earlier this year by the West Virginia Department of Transportation (which is responsible for maintaining the bridge) after “being dark” since March 2014, had to be repaired instead of replaced because the cobalt blue color that signifies the military Purple Heart is no longer mined and lenses for the lights could not be found. Blenko Glass, in Milton, W.Va., managed to replicate the color and produce a limited number for the bridge. The original lights, according to WVDOT, burst because of the bulb heat, which reaches in excess of 200 degrees. The heat generated by the bulbs could not escape because of the original covers. Warren Skaggs, repair and design engineer with the WVDOT, told Ohio Valley Publishing earlier this year that each heat-tempered bulb was replaced, as well as several ballasts. Skaggs said the bulbs have a four-year life.

The Bridge of Honor, connecting Pomeroy, Ohio, and Mason, W.Va., glows in full illumination Sunday night over the Ohio River. The cobalt blue lights, installed earlier this year by the West Virginia Department of Transportation (which is responsible for maintaining the bridge) after “being dark” since March 2014, had to be repaired instead of replaced because the cobalt blue color that signifies the military Purple Heart is no longer mined and lenses for the lights could not be found. Blenko Glass, in Milton, W.Va., managed to replicate the color and produce a limited number for the bridge. The original lights, according to WVDOT, burst because of the bulb heat, which reaches in excess of 200 degrees. The heat generated by the bulbs could not escape because of the original covers. Warren Skaggs, repair and design engineer with the WVDOT, told Ohio Valley Publishing earlier this year that each heat-tempered bulb was replaced, as well as several ballasts. Skaggs said the bulbs have a four-year life.
http://mydailysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_BridgeOfHonor1.jpgThe Bridge of Honor, connecting Pomeroy, Ohio, and Mason, W.Va., glows in full illumination Sunday night over the Ohio River. The cobalt blue lights, installed earlier this year by the West Virginia Department of Transportation (which is responsible for maintaining the bridge) after “being dark” since March 2014, had to be repaired instead of replaced because the cobalt blue color that signifies the military Purple Heart is no longer mined and lenses for the lights could not be found. Blenko Glass, in Milton, W.Va., managed to replicate the color and produce a limited number for the bridge. The original lights, according to WVDOT, burst because of the bulb heat, which reaches in excess of 200 degrees. The heat generated by the bulbs could not escape because of the original covers. Warren Skaggs, repair and design engineer with the WVDOT, told Ohio Valley Publishing earlier this year that each heat-tempered bulb was replaced, as well as several ballasts. Skaggs said the bulbs have a four-year life.
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